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20121104
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working on an administrative issue through law school and was very interested in how admissions worked and how students did after they graduated and it didn't take long to sort of look at what was happening, to sense something like "mismatch" might be important. we were admitting large preferences, and 90% chance of graduating only a 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. that meant only 45% of students we were admitting actually went on to smoothly go through law school and get their law degrees. wasn't hard to look at other schools in los angeles where students wouldn't have gotten in without references to see that those students had better outcomes. us started looking into this and look for a relevant database to test this and in 2004-2005 developed the paper that first discusses the issue in law school context and found this is quite a large problem, nationally the great bulk of minority students especially african-american students were receiving large preferences on a scale of a couple hundred spt points. traits were generally poor for this group. only a third of black starting
. my biggest concern was law enforcement but in law enforcement is the same thing. they are incredibly well trained and intelligent and good at their jobs so you better have an explanation for everything. the day i got pulled over they asked me you have been arrested, i have never been arrested in my life which is true but they searched the car and found drugs and i was a product of the system. it was irrelevant that the search was illegal. the drugs were in the car. they got the drugs off of the street but that has not been an effective strategy when you start looking at the drug war. >> so you are busted. some time later you have -- there's another legal issue that comes up. your back is against eyewall and that is when you get the knock on the door. you walk out and somebody says these are law enforcement people out here. i was arrested. >> i was arrested and scared straight. i decided i would rather be poor and free than half a little bit of money and not able to sleep at night. soaker two years i was on probation. i paid an attorney to $32,000 to get me off the hook and that is so
in the question when i was innocently working on the administrative issues for the law school that i taught, and i was very interested in the idea of academic sports, missions work, and it didn't take long to sort of look at what was happening to sense that something like a mismatch might be important. we were admitting students at ucla with large preferences who have a 90% chance of congratulating the only 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. so that i cumulatively meant that only 45% of the students with large preferences that were admitting went on to go through law school and get their degrees. it wasn't hard to look at the schools and los angeles where the students with preferences would have gotten in without preference to see that those students seemed to have much better outcomes so i started looking into this and looked for the databases that could help test it, and by 2004, 2005, developed the paper that we first discussed this in the context and found that this was quite a large problem that nationally the great bulk of the minority students especially african-american students were
spokesman. republican policies that have been being pushed by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, demagogued as racist, racist, racist, and when nixon says "law and order" we know what he's talking about. no law and order policies instituted by reagan and bush judges, rudy guiliani, bless his souls, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was reformed, black lives were saved in a different way. welfare and law and order were so successful, bill clinton claimed credit for both. [laughter] we had 12 years of paradise, that's in the chapter, post-oj pair dice describing wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on egg shells anymore with the list of words you just mentioned. people had to be worried back then you would innocently say a word that would be deemed racist. you would ruin your career. you would be -- you would be hated by all of human kind. that was over after oj. a lot of the change after oj was really very subtle, but it was a wonderful thing that happenedded for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long
and biofuels. either in the law and started researching and i said what about cannabis. she said best there is. magnitudes better than corn or slowly and i said but? don't you know? we are not even allowed to talk about it. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. conservative political pundit ann coulter presents her thoughts on race in america next on booktv. the author speaks at the four seasons hotel in los angeles for 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for bringing ancient history, elbow to elbow. that is the key as everyone knows. it is an honor to be here. trivial information. forget it when you are out the door. it is an honor to be here. having been an actor simon recovered actors who is now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the club and all the statement has done to create the first oasis in the desert that is hollywood. thank you for that. really appreciate it. [applause] deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david did. you were magnificent on all the news channels exposing the travesty of the current a
to their name. that is by law. so it's very easy to target black voters. now, as it turns out i started going through these names. i will give you one name, okay? from in the book here where i show you the actual purge list in "billionaires & ballot bandits." there is a mr. robert moore convicted of a felony crime and so all the black robert moore's in florida lost their. there are a few in florida but not only robert moore's from florida but brought moore, bobby more's they said these were covers for for the spell in trying to, including mrs. bobby moore. mr. moore gets convicted of a crime and mrs. bobby moore loses her vote but they got thing -- one thing right. she is b. al: a and by the way when i say she is, this is not from kathryn harrison's list. this is from a current list used by the state of florida, in which every single voter on this list, everyone, no exception, their only crime is voting while black. we can't find -- "the new york times" took four years to pick up the story for me, for years and it was on top of the bbc nightly news and they said the list was flawed. no, it's
by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, but they were demagogue is racist, racist, racist. when nixon says law and order we know what is really talking about. instituted by bye bye reagan-bush judges and rudy giuliani, bless his soul from new york city, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was finally reformed tens of thousands of black lives were saved in a different way. welfare was so successful in law and order bills were so successful they were claiming credit for both. so we had 12 years of paradise within the chapter, post-o.j. paradise and many wonderful things that happened. most of all people were not walking on egg shells anymore. add to the list of words you just mentioned. people would worry about that you would innocently say a word and it he would ruin your career and you would be hated by all of humankind. that was over after oj and a lot of the change after oj was very subtle but it was a wonderful thing that happened for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long time ago and along comes barack obama the most li
there was a difference between criminal law and tort law it was called intent if you accelerated somebody that was not murder now there is a man in jail southern mississippi 10 years without parole for putting clean fill dirt on his land sometimes it is moving dirt from an area to another. some was well intended the clean water act says you cannot dump pollutants per kriet agree. no chemical company should be allowed the nine your own land is not the same as dumping chemicals. >> host: and utilities and the senate? >> i brought the peg family from idaho ss of new $5,000 per day fine and told they cannot build on their land no water touches there they and it there's no rainwater new government said it is a wetland. looked at the website. it is not there. they say the website is not perfect. another family were raising bunnies and fined $90,000 with the rahm license. they had one. they said pay as within 30 days with your credit card. 90,000? but if not the fine is 3.1 million. these of the stories that should make americans mad and say no more. a big government run amok. >> what is your bi
have strong connections with the city. my wife went to college here. my brother went to law school here is still practices here million diss sun does live in the city with his family. my wife has aunts and cousins so i have a strong connection to atlanta. tonight i will discuss abraham lincoln's role in the crisis of the union 18631861. more specifically what abraham lincoln and rejected any meaningful compromise following his election the country was gripped by a crisis because they feared lincoln it was the number party and probably sell. it did not have a significant connection lincoln was elected without a single electoral votes without the slave states and own the for border states and they are merely a handful. for the first time in nation's history to be taking over the executive branch of the national government. in the south major institution is the republicans' determination into a unit to win a national election without southern support republicans condemned the south as undemocratic. even un-american. with this party on the threshold for those who practice the gospel and new
with the city. my wife went to college here. one of my brothers went to law school here, and he still lives in a city and practices law here. older son also went to law school. but he does not live in a city. my youngest son does, however, with his family. he lives here. moreover, my wife has an aunt and cousins who live in the city. so i still have very strong connections to land. now, tonight i'm going to discuss abraham lincoln stroll, 1860-1861. more specifically, i want to talk about why abraham lincoln rejected any meaningful compromise. following his election as president november 1860, the country the script but a crisis. because many southerners feared lincoln and his republican party. republican party was a northern party, and proudly so. but it did not have a significant southern connection. lincoln was elected without a single electoral votes from any of the 15 slave states, and only four border states, missouri, kentucky, maryland and delaware did he get any popular vote. and they are nearly a handful. for the first time in the nation's history, a party without any notable sout
the pros do their job. >> do you think it's time for laws of robotics? >> the three laws of robotics are the rules that stop robots from killing. everybody brings this up, and for a robot to be smart enough to apply the three laws, they've already taken over the world; right? [laughter] that's really hard. that's artificial intelligence. turns out it's, like, just shooting guns, that's easy. robots are good at that stuff, but bad at reassuring people. that's not the way it's going to happen. we can't have -- we can't have robots with the intelligence to make ethical choices. we need to search society and cull qhur, what's what's going on, and evolve our regulatory and surveillance activity to stop it early. >> back to the technology, and there's questions about hobbyists, and you talked about the doctor e-mailing you, the dna for your vaccine. what if it was a spoof e-mail. e-mail is easy to spoof. ingest this, give it to your kids. worry about that? >> i talked to craig at length about this. right now, dna sint thinks is done by big companies. you can design a, you know, games on th
law obeyed in the second they saw was a rental car and a young kid, they pulled me over right away. he was the first time that a group the pattern that they looked for. and now of course they look for anything because the drug trade has become so profitable and lucrative. it's a $30 billion trade that anyone using anything, grandparents using rvs come to people in there as fishing boats and they go to the lake, doing anything because profits are enormous. so the cops are aware to look for that now. >> hipolito, how about your mexican background in relation to being able to infiltrate these groups? >> it was extremely important and yet i have to understand is that as soon as kind of thing that my spanish might not have been what it was from someone in mexico or central america when i was working on the cartels. the thing that it was brought out is the criminal element is not limited to hispanic american, but i was able to use my background again where i grew up, and seen some of the things that i grew up, so i was able to capitalize on my background, infiltrating. but what is important,
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
of family life so the rest of us can feel safe. my son-in-law is currently on his eighth deployment. my daughter is in special operations are my heroes. here is part of their everyday. although my name is listed as writing a chapter in this book, i cannot take all the credit. i was still so broken at a time of disaster at the rate the difficulty expressing myself. isn't that for my husband, gary, mathews went to reset comments high school sweetheart to work with them on the student council and his naval academy friend, matthew stories would not have been without their input and i deeply think them for their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrifice and the love of country and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest literary source in the world. freedom isn't free. god bless our military family and god bless america. [applause] >> thank you, lisa, thank you, mrs. freeman. war brings us our own weakness, but to the challenges we face over the past 10 years of war, we also got stronger. and the seth ly
of law was applied a little bit more broadly and not necessarily for any other reason other than making sure there wouldn't be n new entrance to this kind ofw special club. >> host: in the western pressw during this crisis or uprising in syria, alepo was described as the commercial center of the country. why is that? tell us about that city. >> guest: for several hundred years, if not more, it was the meeting point between europe and asia and always developed a -- developed as a center of trade and commerce. that comet -- continued, of course, throughout the centuries throughout the 20th century and made it what it is in terms of its trade, in terms of its trade potential. now, also, it's a large city, not just a second city, it has been a place where many traders and manufacturers as well preferred either because it was historically quite vibrant or because it was far away from the center where they might have a bit more freedom, even though that margin of freedom was not wide. >> host: where are you from originally? >> guest: i'm lebanese, but my mother is syrian. >> host: lebanon
structures. right now, washington is like that faraway farm that is generating these laws. and that tomatoes that taste like cardboard is a lot of having to do with this. we have so many ideas about how individuals and towns have been able to do exciting works. i think that is incredibly important. what i learned was the importance of dialogue and deliberation. i am someone who likes action. i was not convinced that it was so important for all of us to get together and have conversations and shared things like this. but working with susan and seeing the example, talking about the different examples really convinced me, particularly in new hampshire. they were in the middle of this bitter redistricting. they went through this whole process to where they are able to create study circles. so the people can come together and realize what fools they have in common. they came up with a plan that involved people that get really evolve. for them to be able to do that and take these possibilities that weren't there in the national conversation, you are either for or against. what they were able to do
, malthus was quote, in favor of resorting to law for professing. malthus teaches us in the english system one must devote one part of the community to death by famine or else to the necessity of living above half their lives without after tech shuns. according to taylor england was offering its people a stark choice between mass starvation on the one hand, or marital delay, population limitation and emotional private vision on the other. taylor even went so far as to use opposition to malthus as a means of justifying slavery. he taxed malthus with improposing a kind of moral slavery on his followers than was worse than any kind of legal slavery. is malthus, quote, proposes to introduced a system of celibacy taylor asked, who could fail to notice the difference in point of benevolence between indirect slavery to an absolute master, and direct slavery to an absolute master? in taylor's america even those subjected to quote, direct slavery to an absolute master retained the right to reproduce. in taylor's america then no matter all the other freedoms that were denied to enslaved people, incl
laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of the period of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from the state on the sun belt. when johnson from texas, richard nixon from california. gerald ford was never elected, so he doesn't count. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california. the first george bush via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second question texas. so too does the natives and so ways a watershed election. it ends the 40 year. the sun belt dominance. their issues critical in the politics that developed that came out of the sun belt. th
. typos, gaiman's law is no matter how beautiful and how much effort you put into the book, when the new book arrives you will grab it and randomly turn to any page. i will go down and you will see a typo. it is now gotten to the point that i expect and almost disappointed if it doesn't happen. some doctor whos. did you know that the word hello would become one of the most tear jerking moments in doctor who history? no i didn't. i just thought it was a really good joke. i loved the idea that the first thing said to the doctor is good bye. her first line is good bye. the last thing she got to say was hello. i liked -- i thought it was so clever. i was proud of myself. i did not realize i would break hearts. i just thought i am really clever. will your next episode features the titus as human again? noaa absolutely not. not only that but i even put one line to make sure it couldn't happen again. this is where we talked. she might be lying but that is where she talked. will i be writing another episode of doctor who? yes. [cheers and applause] the last e-mail i read before coming down here
whether they get to eat. religion is banned, there is no rule of law and received political infraction that with harsh punishment that is out to three generation of a person's family. a political offender knows that when he goes to prison, his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today, and more than alley and perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. it's thanks to the testimony of north koreans that have escaped. these are the people that i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best efforts of the family regime to keep it secret. for more than 50 years ever since the end of the korean war, north korea has been sealed off from the world's eyes. the family regime has pursued an isolationist policy and maintains an iron grip on information. access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government and its donald must be fixed to the government-run radio station. to enforce this rule, security police equipped with scanners, cru
michigan law school, a columnist, author of eight "new york times" best sellers, confirming the ladies of "the view" are the only ones who have not read the books, they can't comment on them. "mugged," that book is insightful and i encourage everybody to read it. permly, after reading it, i felt so unburdened and liberated i'm going to go ahead and get rid of the secret coded racial words bottled up. chicago golf laze city angry, constitution, experience, food stamps, holding down the fort, privileged, professor, kitchen cabinet, peanut butter, and also community organizer, black hole, apartment, and chair. all racially coded words. now that i'm on a roll, and it's a friendly crowd, i'll say thee most racist statement deemed by the current view out there. okay, here it goes. if you are sensitive, forgive me. the most racist comment -- i am not voting for president obama. there you go. [cheers and applause] got to get that off my chest. i feel a lot better. feel free to say that to the person next to you as well if you feel that way. now, all joking aside, we live in an upside down worl
the daughter of a wealthy man. so when that man, when his father-in-law died he inherited to slaves one of which was the first lady's great, great, great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia where the vast majority of people were not slave owners, where white men work the field alongside the slaves that they owned if they owned any so it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> and it was quite a different experience. i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and how the man who owned her work the fields and i know that you weren't able to determine the relationship between melting the m. and the man who owned her and i also know that there was a lot of silence, a code of silence around that relationship. it seemed like she never talked about it and her descendents never talked about it and i notice the same thing in my own family and other families as well. isabel wilkerson who wrote about the great migration said that the code of silence was in her family. what is up with that sort of si
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22